Author Topic: Pixelnet strobe controller  (Read 5964 times)

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2015, 07:49:16 AM »
Sam,
Ray offers 2 different types of strobe that can run off of the f16. ( pic attached ) the round plastic domed ones are 12v, and  i was not that  happy with them. The node style ones are 5v and have some good pop, especially when you put a c9 bulb cover on. I  tested them with the th2010 controller that I have used for few years and the 5v get some good  randomness playing with the speed as they are a strobe bulb but you have to make them strobe  they did not make it into the show this year but I can run a couple of tests in the morning using  xlight strobe function and adjusting the time of the effect. To see what that does. I wonder if there could be an addition to the usc utility to help make the strobe effect, or a modification to the v2 usc to allow it instead of adding another board to the mix. Not sure  if it is possible or not . Just cant beat a xeon ac strobe.  :)

Good stuff.  Please report back on the tests.  I think you are right about the xenon but I think most of us need a more economical solution and are willing to sacrifice some quality.  I am aiming for 100 minimum. 
Sam

Last year's video: https://vimeo.com/150560653

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2016, 10:33:14 AM »
Corey, sounds like you are getting at least a better idea how you are approaching this.  Care to share any thoughts?  Not sure if you plan to use just led chip or use the star shaped heat sink etc. 

Also curious if folks know much about led color.  I got excited to find cool white leds up to 30,000k.  Same color as a lightning bolt I guess...  Xenon strobe is about 5-6000k IIRC. 

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2016, 04:38:40 PM »
Got my samples of the 3w 30K chips and man they are BRIGHT.  Spots in the eyes 3-5 minutes just glancing at them.  Color is great too.  Wife and I agree VERY strobe light look.  Confident these are bright enough for what I want. 

Offline arw01

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2016, 11:05:46 PM »
where did you find those Zwiller, and you used them on the Komby blinkin?

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2016, 05:37:46 AM »
Just found them on ebay, 10 for $5 shipped from China: http://www.ebay.com/itm/231609103852?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&var=530843776680&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT  I went with the star base.  Have not done much testing but fired one up for about 30m and no burning or smoke.  I have no desire to use these but for strobes BUT I might do some sequenced with some fades.  Just so it is clear, all I did was apply 5v to chip via an old wall wart.  No other components, a la dirk cheap strobe. 

Komblinkin built but needs sketches uploaded.  Totally clueless on this but will post my results.  Another member has volunteered to make a sketch that fires strobes upon power getting around the Komby wireless component I know even less about.  Cool part with Komblinkin is you can edit strobe interval from the sketch. 

Offline arw01

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2016, 09:05:33 AM »
ah nuts he went on vacation!

What are you thinking of protecting them in?  maybe those little round storage tins with the plastic lids, or the stacking fishing containers that are all transparent would work.  Glue some stand offs on them, run the wires from the sides, silicon those or epoxy them in there.

May be able to get some of Ray's domes or he might even source some of these and wire them up for us and put them in the little domes.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2016, 09:58:19 PM »
Got my samples of the 3w 30K chips and man they are BRIGHT.  Spots in the eyes 3-5 minutes just glancing at them.  Color is great too.  Wife and I agree VERY strobe light look.  Confident these are bright enough for what I want.
Interesting.  I thought 30,000kelvin was ultraviolet.   Xenon strobes are around 6,000kelvin I believe
Vixen and xLights for sequencing / FPP for scheduling and playing / Falcon controllers for pixels / DIY controllers for everything else

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2016, 07:27:17 AM »
I have the dirk cheap plastic shells to start with.  First up is a small side hole for wire hot glued in and out with threads coasted with silicone adhesive prior to assembly.  They will get a 2 day submerge.  Hopefully that's enough.   Epoxy is plan B.  The main focus of my testing will be spacing and randomness.  For me, I plan to attach a "bank" of 4 on each house element but may need to go up to 2 banks of4(8)...  I will also mount them on ground elements too as well as make some ground stakes to hot glue these to.  Goal is to get them randomly scattered 2'-4' throughout whole display for real overall baffling effect.  Strobes are my main goal this year. 

@puppy: The 30K thing could be total BS but I figured what the heck and gave them a shot.  They definitely have a bluer/purplish overtone to them over cool white tho.   
 

Offline AussiePhil

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2016, 05:24:05 PM »
Have not done much testing but fired one up for about 30m and no burning or smoke. Just so it is clear, all I did was apply 5v to chip via an old wall wart.  No other components, a la dirk cheap strobe. 

No burning or smoke may have been more good luck than good management in this case, likely saved by a low capacity wall wart.

All LED's should be driven by constant current sources or appropriate resistive values to limit the current to specifications.

A 3W LED is a 700mA device with a Vf of 3.2-3.6v according to the ebay link, applying 5v directly would see greater than 700mA being drawn but without one on the bench it's hard to know what it would be, however current tends to rise nearly exponentially once you go past the upper Vf point.

Certainly 3W and generally 1W LED's require proper constant current drivers and it's one of the reasons LED strobes are neither cheap nor easy if done even vaguely correctly.

The nice thing about strobes is you can up the current to 2x or more due to the very low duty cycle, but again via CC drivers, and this then makes then unsuitable for general use.




Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2016, 08:26:33 AM »
Touche'.  Primarily ran them long term just to make sure it wouldn't burn up in case they got stuck on or something.  Surely not the best way to run them.  I fooled with some current limiting resistors on my 1W versions (1W 47ohm/350ma) but they so dang big.  The 700ma equivalent is 1W 22ohm based on the online calculators.  Eddie, what's your taking on going about them this way? 

Offline AussiePhil

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2016, 10:05:10 PM »
Touche'.  Primarily ran them long term just to make sure it wouldn't burn up in case they got stuck on or something.  Surely not the best way to run them.  I fooled with some current limiting resistors on my 1W versions (1W 47ohm/350ma) but they so dang big.  The 700ma equivalent is 1W 22ohm based on the online calculators.  Eddie, what's your taking on going about them this way?

mmmm, not sure I would trust that online calculator if that's the numbers your getting but I no idea of the base assumptions.

Here's what I get based on the following
LED Vf varies from 3.2v to 3.6v, so lets use an average of 3.4v
3w LED with 700mA current

For a 12V supply the resistor of 12.28 Ohms drops 8.6v and dissipates 6.02W of power and limits current to 700mA
For LED Vf of 3.2v the same resistor would allow 720mA
for LEd Vf of 3.6 the same resistor would allow 680mA

This variance is not a big issue and well inside resistor tolerance values anyway.

Now if Vdd is 5V this gets worse as the resistor values are significantly lower (around 2 Ohms) with current varying from 610ma to 790mA at each end of the LED Vf specification.
However the Power dissipated in the resistor is less than 1.5W Max in all cases.

Cheers
Phil



Offline JoelRose

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2016, 11:59:07 PM »
A different perspective on the topic.

I run 3watt stars with their own on board pic, triggered by standard Renard code
Maybe someone could pick this up and create a board others could use.

http://doityourselfchristmas.com/forums/showthread.php?20651-Re-purposing-some-3w-stars-as-pest-deterrent&highlight=strobe

Joel

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2016, 08:38:59 AM »
The 700ma equivalent is 1W 22ohm based on the online calculators.
mmmm, not sure I would trust that online calculator if that's the numbers your getting but I no idea of the base assumptions.
My guess is zwiller was looking at a 5v supply and a 3w LED with Vf of 3.6~3.8 which I believe calculates to a 2.2ohm 1W resistor.  So I think there was a decimal point missing

Offline zwiller

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2016, 08:58:16 AM »
The 700ma equivalent is 1W 22ohm based on the online calculators.
mmmm, not sure I would trust that online calculator if that's the numbers your getting but I no idea of the base assumptions.
My guess is zwiller was looking at a 5v supply and a 3w LED with Vf of 3.6~3.8 which I believe calculates to a 2.2ohm 1W resistor.  So I think there was a decimal point missing

YEP! Did the numbers on the phone...  My bad.  In addition, I used 33ohm 3W resistors for the 1w for 12v supply.  Getting all my numbers mixed up trying to fix a speaker crossover.   ::)

Am I correct that CC or current limiting should be as bright as applying 5v?

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: Pixelnet strobe controller
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2016, 02:20:41 PM »
Am I correct that CC or current limiting should be as bright as applying 5v?
You said earlier that you used an old wall-wart to test these.  I'll take a SWAG and guess it was a 5v, 500mA or 750mA wall wart, so even though you didn't have an external current-limiting resistor, you were limited by the capacity of the wall-wart.

If it was 500mA from the wall-wart then you will get the same brightness from a 500mA CC power supply.  If it was a 750mA wall-wart then you were over-driving the LED a little bit over its 700mA spec.   Either way, sending the same amount of current from a CC power supply would deliver the same level of brightness.

On the other hand, if you were using a 1a wall-wart, then you were over-driving the LED a lot.   Changing to CC @ 700mA would not be as bright as over-driving at 1A but it should still be very bright and last a lot longer.

 

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