Author Topic: What Am I Doing Wrong  (Read 285 times)

Offline lrhorer

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Re: What Am I Doing Wrong
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2018, 08:49:15 PM »
It may help for you to understand what all these numbers, names, and ports are:

DNS: Domain Name Server - Not required for operation of any host at the IP level.  If you are contacting the various devices strictly via IP address, then this is superfluous.  It is also superfluous for contacting hosts within a private LAN, such as yours, behind a firewall router.  All that DNS does is allow a user to contact a host somewhere on the internet using its domain name, rather than an IP address. Yahoo.com and google. com are examples.  It does need to be functional to get software updates for FPP, but not for basic networking.

Gateway: A host that bridges a LAN, such as your private LAN, to a wider set of networks, also known as a Wide Area Network.  This is also not required for basic operation with a single LAN segment.  Note it is possible your Gateway router also provides switching for your LAN, so the hosts may have to be connected to it, but for basic wired LAN operation, the gateway address is not required.  It is absolutely required in order to reach the internet, and assuming your gateway router is also your wireless Access Point, then it is also required to be connected to your network, but once again the Gateway IP address is not required for strictly local operation on a single subnet.

Subnet: also known as Network address or loosely as Subnet Mask.  Every host on a subnet knows how to talk directly to every other host on the same subnet.  More than one subnet may exist on a single physical LAN, but in general most of the hosts on one subnet cannot talk directly to any host on a different subnet.  On any given subnet, all the hosts will have the same network address, but each will have its own unique host address.  Common examples on home networks are a network address of 192.168.1 (properly shown as 192.168.1/24) or 192.168.0.  Every computer on your LAN with an address of 192.168.0.xxx can talk directly to every other computer with an address of 192.168.0.yyy.  They cannot, however, speak directly to a computer with an IP of 192.168.1.zzz.  Note it is perfectly permissible for a computer to have more than 1 IP address, even on a single network interface.  The reverse is not true, however.  Indeed, if the computer has more than 1 network interface (i.e. the RPi with both a wired and wireless interface), then it must have more than 1 IP address, and they definitely should be on different subnets if both are active.

Subnet Mask: A number which determines the network address of every host on a subnet.  It is a binary string of ones followed by some number of zeroes.  The non-zero portions of the mask are bit wise ANDed with the host IP to produce the network address.  Thus, a host with an IP of 192.168.1.75 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 (11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000) has a network address of 192.168.1.  It can talk directly to any computer with the same subnet mask and an IP address of 192.168.1.xxx.  Given there are two reserved host addresses in every subnet, this means such a subnet can have up to 254 IP addresses on it ranging from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254.  A computer with the same IP but a mask of 255.255.255.240 can only talk directly to 14 hosts (including itself) with a range of 192.168.1.65 through 192.168.1.78.  A computer with an IP of 192.168.1.100 and a mask of 255.255.255.240 can also talk to 14 different hosts, but they range from 192.168.1.97 through 192.168.1.110.  The network address of the subnet in question is 192.168.1.96.  To keep your life simple, set up all your subnets with a mask of 255.255.255.0.  If any of your machines has more than one active physical interface, set them up on different subnets.  For example, I am using Falcon F16v3 controllers attached to my RPi's wired ethernet interface.  They are all on 192.168.8/24 (which means the mask is a string of 24 ones followed by 8 zeros, or 255.255.255.0).  The FPP GUI runs on the wireless interface with a network address of 192.168.1/24.  All of the 192.168.1/24 hosts talk to each other directly.  Any computer than needs to talk to one of the F16 controllers must do so through the RPi.

Route: A host or network address where a device will send any packets on a subnet other than its own.  If a host has a default route, it will send all traffic it otherwise has no idea how to handle to that gateway.  With no routes provisioned (not even a default route / gateway), a host can still speak to all the devices on its subnet, but nothing else.

DHCP: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol - A means via which a router or other server can supply IP, DNS and WINS information directly to a host automatically without any user intervention.  It is more or less a Plug-N-Play way to set up a LAN.  Virtually all low to medium end consumer routers have an internal DHCP server set up by default.  Only one device on a subnet should ever have DHCP active (unless one is running parallel servers), so if you have multiple routers or Access Points, be sure only one is active for any given subnet.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 09:16:15 PM by lrhorer »

Offline lrhorer

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Re: What Am I Doing Wrong
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2018, 08:52:55 PM »
Well everything is set to zero's & saved and both set to DCHP & now I can't even get an IP address. So now What?

That does not quite make sense.  If the interface is set for DHCP, then everything else is grayed-out.  They cannot be set to anything.  See my previous post.  Note the interface settings and the DNS settings are provisioned separately in FPP.  One may get the IP dynamically but set the DNS manually.  Don't worry about DNS until you have IP working.

On a single wired LAN, DHCP is as simple as leaving the DHCP server active on your router and setting the host to get both IP and DNS setting from the router.  On a wireless network one usually will also have to set up security, unless one is using an open (unsecured) network.  This is not recommended.

How do you know what settings you have in FPP?  Do you have a monitor and keyboard attached to the RPi?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 09:08:17 PM by lrhorer »

Offline mmais68569

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Re: What Am I Doing Wrong
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2018, 06:18:49 AM »
Yes I have a monitor connected to my Pi
Mike

Offline lrhorer

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Re: What Am I Doing Wrong
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2018, 07:43:17 AM »
OK, then login to the CLLI and type:

Code: [Select]
ifconfig | more
You will see something that looks like this:
Code: [Select]
FPP-Outside:~# ifconfig | more
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr b8:27:eb:5c:af:06 
          inet addr:192.168.8.57  Bcast:192.168.8.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:143698 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1426142720 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:8370687 (7.9 MiB)  TX bytes:3320705069 (3.0 GiB)

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback 
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:65536  Metric:1
          RX packets:1567 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1567 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:82704 (80.7 KiB)  TX bytes:82704 (80.7 KiB)

wlan0     Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr b8:27:eb:09:fa:53 
          inet addr:192.168.1.57  Bcast:192.168.1.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:1736806 errors:0 dropped:129 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:464830 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:650681853 (620.5 MiB)  TX bytes:111307049 (106.1 MiB)

Report the results of the first three lines from each paragraph here.  The output may fill more than the entire screen.  Press the space bar when you are ready to scroll down.

Offline mmais68569

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Re: What Am I Doing Wrong
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2018, 05:59:18 PM »
I would like to thank everyone that helped with my problem. I spent all afternoon trying to load the program with no success. I even went & bought a ne PiB. ethernet cable 2 new SD cards, came home loaded everything & would not load. You do not want to hear the words that came out of my mouth. So reloaded again,& again, & again. Finally went & deleted all the downloads & SD card formatter & started fresh. Made sure every thing was just like the directions on the web site was correct. Plugged new Pi in & everything loaded as it was suppose to, gave me an IP address worked just as it was to. I was able to reset IP address to a static address saved & rebooted all is good. Went to the original Pi which I had problems with & loaded & all is good.
 The only thing I can figure out is that the downloads I was using were not complete & that was causing the problem.
 Again thanks for all the help now on to the next step & setting up a wireless remote to run my controller.
Mike

 

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