Author Topic: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie  (Read 359 times)

Offline flajon62

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FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« on: May 20, 2018, 02:05:22 PM »
This is a long story just to say that I finally got my FFP/Pi3 network setup functioning properly, I think.
As a newbie and as I look back it was ALL there, right in front of me all the time. Just not in any order I could comprehend, fully.
In January I decided to get involved in LED home outdoor Christmas lighting. Seemed like fun.

I started purchasing strings and hardware, most will arrive mid-summer (a cheaper option). I had a Raspberry Pi3  laying around so downloaded and installed the FPP. I couldn't do too much without some LEDs and a controller so I ordered a Falcon F4v3 controller and a string of 100 LEDs from Ray Wu to hold me over and start playing with stuff.

The controller and the 100 LED string came in last week so I set them up for testing. The string (as we all know why) would only light 50 LEDs. Knowing the problem, because in the wait time I read a lot of info (stuff) about falcon controllers, LEDs, YouTube, Xlights ect, ect. Not retaining too much but I thought I did.
I broke out the FPP/PI3 that I had setup over a month ago but I couldnt get it to work. Thinking that I messed it up I did another clean install, then another, another
   
My problem was the FPP would not connect unless the etho wire was attached. Most of you pros will know what the problem is. I set up the network as follows:
          etho Static IP Add        192.168.1.199
                 Netmask                 255.255.255.0
                 Gateway                 192.168.1.1
          wlan Static IP Add       192.168.1.200
                     Netmask            255.255.255.0
                     Gateway            192.168.1.1
                      SSID                 Real Name
                       PSK                 Real Password

I should note that most of my planed setup is on an old Windows laptop with xLights. I could connect via my wifi laptop a Chromebook (this may have been a part of the problem switching back and forth) and using either Static IP address. When I disconnect the FPP etho connection from the RPi the laptop loses connection.The router could see both the wired etho 192.168.1.199 and the wifi wlan at 192.168.1.200. and the HDMI RPi to a monitor can see both IP addresses


For days I formatted the SD card and stick (full and quick) downloaded v1.5, v1.8 changed to a new Pi. All with the same result either I could connect with the eth0 or the wlan0 but not both. Being an old fart, 62, I would not ask for help. First for lack of the right question and that man and direction psyche thing. Anyway.

Today I said to myself One last try I have read too much and this is it.

My last setup:

          Eth0 Static IP Add         192.168.5.199
        Netmask                      255.255.255.0
        Gateway                      Blank
        DNS                            192.168.1.1


         Wlan0 Static IP Add        192.168.1.200
       Netmask                     255.255.255.0
       Gateway                     192.168.1.1
      SSID                          ****
        PSK                           *****

Same thing. Nothing fixed. Then I remembered reading about the CMD prompt thing and thought nah thats just for the controller and im not there yet. Plus is that for the Pi prompt or the Chromebook prompt or the windows prompt. I went for the Windows prompt. I am set up as Administrator soread somewhere about signing in as administrator sooo...

       route add 192.168.5.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.169.1.200 -p      Enter. I got a Requires Elevation message.   WTH!

After some googling. In the Windows Search box type in CMD and right click the icon and select Run as Administrator.  Even though I am setup as Administrator. I typed in cmd prompt (now under \WINDOWS \system32> prompt) line route add 192.168.5.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.169.1.200 -p      I hit Enter and Success!!!


The windows machine can do both eth0 and wlan0 connections and with the Pi eth0 connection

disconnected the wlan0. The Chromebook (which is wifi only,unless I use a dongle) will only connect to the Pi wlan0 connection not the eth0 when the Pi eth0 is connected. Is the normal?

Now onto the next phase-of-fun, F4v3 controller and LED testing and setup.


Next time I have a question Ill ask. If someone has advice for my next phase I would love it.
:)   

Offline AAH

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Re: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2018, 07:11:29 AM »
I know nothing about the route process and I haven't used the wifi on a Pi for a couple of years and can't remember what was installed when I played with a WiPi. The netmask of 255.255.255.0 will typically only allow you to access IP's with the same 3 1st octets 192.168.1.x. Changing to a mask of 255.255.0.0 allows access across 192.168.x.x. The route process you mentioned may allow some sort of fudge that bypasses the masking effect of the the netmask.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2018, 08:21:02 AM »
The windows machine can do both eth0 and wlan0 connections and with the Pi eth0 connection
disconnected the wlan0. The Chromebook (which is wifi only,unless I use a dongle) will only connect to the Pi wlan0 connection not the eth0 when the Pi eth0 is connected. Is the normal?

Yes its normal when you do it that way (route add on windows machine).  You created the static route ("route add" command) on the Windows machine so it will not help the Chromebook.

A better way is to add a static route on your home router.  If you do it there, every PC, Tablet, Smartphone, etc on your home network will be able to use that route.   Unfortunately, every brand has a different way of doing it so you will have to do some googling to find out how to add a static route to your particular model of home router.
xLights and Vixen3 for sequencing / FPP for scheduling and playing / Falcon controllers for pixels / DIY controllers for everything else

Offline TxBillbr

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Re: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2018, 11:14:45 AM »
I know nothing about the route process and I haven't used the wifi on a Pi for a couple of years and can't remember what was installed when I played with a WiPi. The netmask of 255.255.255.0 will typically only allow you to access IP's with the same 3 1st octets 192.168.1.x. Changing to a mask of 255.255.0.0 allows access across 192.168.x.x. The route process you mentioned may allow some sort of fudge that bypasses the masking effect of the the netmask.
Just for clarification (or possibly over-simplification for networking guys  ;) ) The network mask indicates how many bits of the address belong to the "network" and how many belong to that subnet.  So 255.255.255.0 means the the first three octets are for "network" use and the last octet is used to identify the hosts in that subnet. So if I have 192.168.1.24, with a netmask of 255.255.255.0, the subnet is 192.168.2 and the host is 24. However if I need to get from one subnet to another I have to create a "route" that basically says To get packets to 192.168.0 subnet from 192.168.1 subnet, I have to send that traffic to a gateway that understands how to get my packets there. For Windows I would open a cmd window as administrator and enter the command:
ROUTE -P ADD 192.168.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 METRIC 1

 8)  The -P makes the route persistent through reboots. The 192.168.0.0 is the subnet "name". The mask says that the first 24 bits of the "name" are all that matter for routing and 192.168.1.1 is my smart system that can route to that subnet from my 192.168.1 subnet.  The Metric is just a way to indicate that the route is not "high priced", use it at will.


And as indicated above most home wifi routers will do that gateway thing by setting them up properly. Also note that you can tell FPP on Rpi to route between networks in the network settings.

Offline AAH

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Re: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2018, 05:40:30 PM »
Thanks TxBillbrI've understood the netmask for a while and now I "think" I understand what the route does.
What is the benefit, if any, of using the route command over changing the 4rd octet from 255 to a setting that allows both 192.168.0 and 192.168.1
I know nothing about the route process and I haven't used the wifi on a Pi for a couple of years and can't remember what was installed when I played with a WiPi. The netmask of 255.255.255.0 will typically only allow you to access IP's with the same 3 1st octets 192.168.1.x. Changing to a mask of 255.255.0.0 allows access across 192.168.x.x. The route process you mentioned may allow some sort of fudge that bypasses the masking effect of the the netmask.
Just for clarification (or possibly over-simplification for networking guys  ;) ) The network mask indicates how many bits of the address belong to the "network" and how many belong to that subnet.  So 255.255.255.0 means the the first three octets are for "network" use and the last octet is used to identify the hosts in that subnet. So if I have 192.168.1.24, with a netmask of 255.255.255.0, the subnet is 192.168.2 and the host is 24. However if I need to get from one subnet to another I have to create a "route" that basically says To get packets to 192.168.0 subnet from 192.168.1 subnet, I have to send that traffic to a gateway that understands how to get my packets there. For Windows I would open a cmd window as administrator and enter the command:
ROUTE -P ADD 192.168.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 METRIC 1

 8)  The -P makes the route persistent through reboots. The 192.168.0.0 is the subnet "name". The mask says that the first 24 bits of the "name" are all that matter for routing and 192.168.1.1 is my smart system that can route to that subnet from my 192.168.1 subnet.  The Metric is just a way to indicate that the route is not "high priced", use it at will.


And as indicated above most home wifi routers will do that gateway thing by setting them up properly. Also note that you can tell FPP on Rpi to route between networks in the network settings.

Offline TxBillbr

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Re: FPP/PI3 Networking From A Newbie
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2018, 09:28:29 AM »
The only thing that might come into play with making the subnet bigger is if your router has the ability to support it. It also means that multicast lighting packets will be on the house network. I don't know how much traffic interference the lighting will tolerate. (We stream all of our TV)

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk


 

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