Author Topic: Building new home  (Read 492 times)

Offline esolo

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Building new home
« on: December 17, 2018, 11:57:10 AM »
Hello everyone,


I have been away from the forum for some time. Life happened a bit and unfortunately lights took a back seat, but Im back to ask a question that some of you may know the answer to. I wasnt sure where to post this but here goes:


We are building a new home and I would like to anticipate where lights will be placed in order to prewire power, ethernet, etc. I havent kept up with the newest tech in controllers, power distribution, pixels, etc.
I know I will need power in areas under the eves and around the front yard, which I have already figured out. What I am wondering is about Ethernet plugs (which will go at the location of power), how many per location, are they even necessary anymore given all the wireless options?


Thanks in advance for any insight or advice.
Ed

Offline JonB256

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2018, 07:10:50 AM »
Wireless is an option many use. I did for several years. Now I've gone back to E1.31 and actual cable runs. Nobody except me and cats walk through my yard so cables and cords abound.

If going with Wireless, spend a little extra for a Ubiquiti system. Those who have it are very happy with the data integrity and distance.

If going Ethernet, think Gigabit router and switches. They handle the data better whether you use mostly FPP Remote Mode or FPP Bridge Mode or use E1.31 based controllers like the F16v3 or F48.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2018, 10:12:02 AM »
We are building a new home and I would like to anticipate where lights will be placed in order to prewire power, ethernet, etc. I havent kept up with the newest tech in controllers, power distribution, pixels, etc.
I know I will need power in areas under the eves and around the front yard, which I have already figured out. What I am wondering is about Ethernet plugs (which will go at the location of power), how many per location, are they even necessary anymore given all the wireless options?


My show controllers are 100% wireless, but IF I were building a new home I would still put network cables in lots of places.  No matter  how much you plan where lights go today, it will change over time.  I have several power outlets under my eaves, but I always want more.  And none of them have a network connection.  I would use it if it was there.


Also don't skimp on the circuit size for the outdoor power.   Yeah, yeah, leds are so much more efficient than incans....BUT... you'll have thousands of leds compared to hundred of incans.  The amps still adds up to more than a standand 15a circuit can provide.
-Mark

Offline rstehle

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2018, 01:37:55 PM »
We moved in to a new home this year, and had the opportunity to have input on the wiring.  I had dual switched 20 Amp circuits located about 4' AGL on either side of the house, along with an ethernet jack, with wiring to my office.  I did not have any outlets installed under the soffits as I am all Pixels and the controllers are all at ground level.

Offline jnealand

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2018, 02:32:45 PM »
Think about having outlets in CONVENIENT locations.  Sometimes outlets are available, but they are really not convenient to use in terms of running extension cords and going over driveways and sidewalks.    I could probably run my whole show from 2 or 3 outlets, but it would not be convenient to pull all my extension cords from just 1 or 2 locations.  I put two 20a outlets next to my outside AC unit which is on a separate sub panel on the theory that where I live the AC is turned off from Oct thru April and I would not be drawing a current for the AC then.  Ten years ago I had a big chunk of my driveway replaced and I had them put a piece of 4" PVC under the driveway and put caps on the ends.  Still have not used it since I went wireless to my controllers, but might come in handy for a future sprinkler system.  At least it is there and cost almost nothing to install.

Do not forget to think about outlet placement inside your house.  Building code may say outlets should be every x feet, but it might make more sense in some area to have them every 1/2x feet.  x being whatever the code is in your area.  for example They always put an outlet on the wall in a kitchen desk area, but we keep a shredder and a desktop PC under the desk not on it.  YMMV.
Jim Nealand
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Offline critic2

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2018, 06:24:48 PM »
With the receptacles outdoors, I would want one on either side of the entry door so you wouldnt need to cross cords over the steps. And with the ethernet, at every corner of the house in the soffit. Two at each location. If you dont use them for Christmas lighting, you can use it for security cameras.


As an electrician, I figure you can never have too many outlets. As Jim mentioned above, place them where you want to use them, not where the installer wants to put them. The outlet above AND below the counter space at the desk location. A double duplex for the entertainment center. Wall switched controlled soffit receptacles.


Most of the time the customer will do a walkthrough with the electrician and/or builder before the rough wiring takes place. Ask your electrician for ideas. An experienced wireman will share their suggestions with you. Of course, it will cost more for the extras but its more expensive to have it added later. Save the money on the high end carpet and such and put your money behind the walls.

Just my two cents...
« Last Edit: December 19, 2018, 04:36:16 AM by critic2 »
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Still Learning...💡

Offline tbone321

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2018, 10:42:52 PM »
Also, make sure that your outside outlets are on one or more independent circuits.  Code requires these outlets to be GFCI protected and in some cases to save money, the electrician will tap off of an existing GFCI outlet such as in a bathroom, basement, or garage which makes it a real PITA if it trips.  In my house, they tapped off of the one in the Garage which also happens to also be connected to another outlet that powers my freezer.  Guess how much fun I had when a rain storm caused it to trip and I didn't see it until the next night when that part of my display didn't light up,  I would make sure that each outlet has its own protection or is itself am independent GFCI outlet if code in your area allows so this way if one trips, that is the only part of your display that goes out and it also makes it much easier to find the source of the problem when it does.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2018, 10:49:34 PM by tbone321 »

Offline jnealand

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2018, 09:11:09 AM »
Forgetting outlets for a moment, I have found it useful to have my driveway paved a little wider than normal.  Depending on where you live it is nice to be able to walk easily besides cars parked in the driveway when it is raining or when snow is piled up on the side.  I like to have them built 12-18" wider on each side.  Also have all sidewalks built as 4 ft and not 3ft - much easier for two folks to walk side by side.  Put a slab on the side of the garage if that is where you park your garbage and recycle bins.  I prefer not to have them in the garage and outside if that is possible.

Have all interior doors handicap accessible if possible.  We all age and have aging relatives and visitors.

Back to outlets.  Do not overlook the number and placement of outlets in the garage.  It never fails when you buy a battery powered leaf blower or weed wacker there is no convenient outlet.  It is much easier and cheaper to put in extra now than later.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2018, 10:44:05 AM »
Do not overlook the number and placement of outlets in the garage.  It never fails when you buy a battery powered leaf blower or weed wacker there is no convenient outlet.  It is much easier and cheaper to put in extra now than later.


That is an excellent point.  I see new houses with lots of outlets in the kitchen, office, and entertainment areas which is great.  But they still seem to skimp on the GARAGE.  I'm always wanting more outlets there.  Great point Jim.

Offline K-State Fan

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2018, 12:29:11 PM »
Do not overlook the number and placement of outlets in the garage.  It never fails when you buy a battery powered leaf blower or weed wacker there is no convenient outlet.  It is much easier and cheaper to put in extra now than later.


That is an excellent point.  I see new houses with lots of outlets in the kitchen, office, and entertainment areas which is great.  But they still seem to skimp on the GARAGE.  I'm always wanting more outlets there.  Great point Jim.
Yes it is a good point.  I do not think there is anything in the code on number of outlets in a garage like there is for every other room.

Offline algerdes

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2018, 01:30:38 PM »
The NEC usually states the "minimum" number of outlets (and their distance apart).  I've never seen where there is a "maximum" number - in the code, that is.
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Offline K-State Fan

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2018, 01:57:00 PM »
Correct minimum in the house is 6 feet, along counter tops 2 feet and garage one per car.
That could be different depending on code cycle or local additions to code.

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2018, 03:53:03 PM »
Do not overlook the number and placement of outlets in the garage.  It never fails when you buy a battery powered leaf blower or weed wacker there is no convenient outlet.  It is much easier and cheaper to put in extra now than later.
Amen!  This summer, I did a major electrical upgrade at my house.  Part of the project replaced the singe 120V 20A circuit to the detached garage that had one duplex outlet and one light when  bought the house.  Now I have a 100A 240V sub panel in the garage.  That has a dedicated 20A circuit for my large air compressor, three 20A circuits to my data cabinet (one dedicated circuit for each 1500VA UPS, plus one for the air conditioner), one 20A circuit for four duplex outlets along the back and left side wall and at the end of the block wall 50 feet out the driveway from the garage, two 20A circuit that go to the workbench, one 20A circuit for the storage shed out back, and a 15A circuit for lights.  Damn, is it ever nice having a quad outlet box every four or five feet along the workbench!  I will be adding a 20A 240V circuit for a table saw I recently was given.  I will also likely add a dedicated circuit for the garage door opener when I get that fixed.

Using LOR (mostly SuperStar) for all sequencing - using FPP only to drive P5 and P10 panels.
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Offline TxBillbr

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2018, 01:02:28 PM »
When I built my new house in 2017, I put two 20A circuits and a 50A circuit to the third bay of the garage(my shop area). Unfortunately the electrical dude didn't mark up the plans and the outlets got put in on the wrong side of the garage. Make sure you get to see the plan markup and all those expensive outlets have placement instructions.


Bill Brothers
Georgetown, TX

Offline Stormyblade

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Re: Building new home
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2018, 06:58:17 AM »
Forgetting outlets for a moment, I have found it useful to have my driveway paved a little wider than normal.  Depending on where you live it is nice to be able to walk easily besides cars parked in the driveway when it is raining or when snow is piled up on the side.  I like to have them built 12-18" wider on each side.  Also have all sidewalks built as 4 ft and not 3ft - much easier for two folks to walk side by side.  Put a slab on the side of the garage if that is where you park your garbage and recycle bins.  I prefer not to have them in the garage and outside if that is possible.

Have all interior doors handicap accessible if possible.  We all age and have aging relatives and visitors.

Back to outlets.  Do not overlook the number and placement of outlets in the garage.  It never fails when you buy a battery powered leaf blower or weed wacker there is no convenient outlet.  It is much easier and cheaper to put in extra now than later.


Since Jim mentioned garages/driveways, let me add this: if you can, have a pipe installed that runs under your driveway. In our new home in Colorado, I had a 3" pipe installed under the driveway for a cost of about $600 extra and it was WELL worth that expense when it came to running cords, etc. through that pipe vs having to run it around.

 

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