Author Topic: atx power supply breakout boards  (Read 5002 times)

Offline taybrynn

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atx power supply breakout boards
« on: February 03, 2016, 09:14:20 AM »
(1) any idea when the next falcon ATX PS board buy might be?   Experiences using them?  What was your use of the Falcon ATX thus far?

(2) would a board like this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V44UNXU?ref_=cm_cd_al_qh_dp_t
     make any sense at a cheaper alternative?   My thought is no, because it lacks the molex connectors and
     I'm unsure what size copper and what combination of input power is allowed.

Thoughts / comments on either would be appreciated.

Offline David Pitts

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2016, 09:36:09 AM »
Wow. At first glance that board looks pretty good.  Need to find out copper weight. But there are plenty of source connectors. The six and eight pin connectors have 3 and 4 12-volt wires each respectively.  I think that makes 18 12-Volt wires besides the two in the 24-pin connector.

The 4-pin hard drive connectors used on DLA and the Falcon only have one each. But the Falcon did have PCIE and other connectors which have more.

I am going to buy one to check it out.


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Offline Bshaver

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2016, 09:39:21 AM »
I have just cut the ends off the power supplies and used terminal strips - with fuses in between and hard wired adapters to various items. 5V lines for the BBB or Pi... Just on the bench though. I use mean wells or other power supplies for the props and the show
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Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2016, 09:51:57 AM »
Cool board and I almost bought one but it appears to have only 12v outputs.

If I'm buying an ATX breakout board, I think I would want both 12v and 5v outputs.
-Mark

Offline David Pitts

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2016, 09:55:17 AM »
It had a 5V connector too. These days the majority of a power supplies power is in the 12V. Mainly to drive video cards and the like.

Offline taybrynn

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2016, 11:24:32 AM »
I agree it looked pretty interesting at first glance.  The description on amazon is a tad confusing, stating something about using
the 6pin "or" the 8pin connectors ... but it would be interesting to get some reviews of this board.

I was also debating whether to buy one to try out also, since its like $11.xx for amazon prime members ... and a decent bench PS
is always nice to have.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2016, 11:47:21 AM »
It had a 5V connector too...
Ah ha.  It wasn't listed in the specs, but now I see it hidden there in the picture.

ATX 24P connector to 12V wire adapter
16 connectors for + or - wires (all 12v)
2 x 6 pin PCIE 12V connectors
3 x 8 pin EPS 12V connectors
1 x 8 pin PCIE 12V connector


I'm also guessing that little push-button is used to trigger the on/off logic in the power supply (with red led to show on/off status)

Offline CaptainMurdoch

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2016, 11:59:04 AM »
It had a 5V connector too...
Ah ha.  It wasn't listed in the specs, but now I see it hidden there in the picture.

ATX 24P connector to 12V wire adapter
16 connectors for + or - wires (all 12v)

That's another place where it gets confusing and will need to be checked.  Is the 5V output, only the white header or is it the green terminal blocks.  The description states 16 connections for +/- (all 12V) which would indicate that the green terminal blocks are all 12V and the '5V' label may be for the white header.

If it checks out, it could be good.  The PCB looks a little thin compared to the Falcon ATX adapter.

One thing missing from this board is the big resistor to keep some kind of load on the power supply when the lights aren't on, so I wonder how well it will work with our kinds of load patterns.
-
Chris

Offline taybrynn

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2016, 11:59:20 AM »
I agree, I had some new ATX power supplies that would keep turning themselves off, if you didn't have a small load present all the time.
They worked fine with DLA active hub, but didn't work well with passive hubs or zeus boards.  Ironically one of these worked great with a zeus
board for some reason, but the others didn't.  I found the "auto off" (on no load) feature to be highly annoying.

The comment that concerned me a little was this bottom one:

Only need to connect it to the PSU 24 pin cable, and then turn on your power supply.

Can also connect 2 x 6 pin or 2 x 8 pin connectors.

And also, there are (3) 8 pin connects (not just 2) ... 2 are EPS 8pin and 1 is PCIE 8pin.

So I take this to mean
(1) connect the 24pin (minimum)
+ (2) optionally PCIE 8pin
+ (3) optionally EPS 8pin x 1or2
        OR
        optionally PCIE 6pin x 1or2


Offline MyKroFt

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2016, 01:12:11 PM »
Most new PC power supplies you can jumper the green wire (3rd in from the side if I remember correctly) to a black with like the small loop of a paper clip, tape it up so it don't short out on something and your PS will never turn off

Tony

Offline taybrynn

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2016, 01:53:56 PM »
Thanks Tony!!!

Offline toozie21

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2016, 07:14:27 AM »
That is what I did with the last one I had to work on too Tony (though I did solder mine and seal with liquid tape since it would be in a box outside).

Offline taybrynn

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2016, 08:02:40 PM »
I got one of these today.   Soldering quality on them seems poor in a couple spots ... Wondering  if it's lead soldered cause it doesn't melt when I tried to reflow a couple spots.  Haven't hooked it up to anything yet.

Offline David Pitts

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2016, 08:06:38 PM »
Lead solder melts and flows better than non leaded.

Offline tbone321

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Re: atx power supply breakout boards
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2016, 08:24:07 PM »
Lead solder melts and flows better than non leaded.

Ain't that the truth.  take a close look at the board and make sure that it doesn't have a coating on it.

 

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