Author Topic: Mounting Pixels on the Roof  (Read 454 times)

Offline PittFan

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Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« on: January 21, 2019, 06:45:17 PM »
I want to outline the roof of my house for 2019.  I have always put this off mostly because I have to get on the roof but that can be overcome.
I also live in the Northeast and it just so happens to snow a bit.  I was always concerned the snow would cover the lights.  The snow could act as a diffuser which could be a nice effect but at some point the lights really wouldn't be all that visible with a large amount of snow. 
That being said I would still like to do this.  I have thought up some ways to possible raise the lights off the roof with a frame of pipes but then I wonder about being able to keep the frame on the roof and trying to accommodate the ridge line.  I thought the ridge line could actually be used to "hold" the frame on the house (i.e. prevent it from sliding down the roof).  Has anybody thought of a way to do this?  I was thinking of creating an "X" using pipe and a screw to allow for any pitch of roof.  The "X" would sit on the ridge line and the top part of the "X" would hold the frame.  The only thing is this just doesn't provide that much height off the roof.  I'm not aware of any kind of "T" fitting that cold do this which would be ideal.  Possibly some canopy frame fittings but then I'm limited to only certain angles.


Then there is the need to make sure the frame doesn't fly away.  Sandbags or other weights and some rope?


I would be interested in knowing what others thought or have done.
Thanks.

Offline mararunr

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Re: Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2019, 07:39:06 AM »
Here's some pics of how I do it and a link to a post I did on FB about my roof elements.  For the outline I attach my pixels to PVC to a) keep them aligned and b) raised in the case of some snow.  I use rebar attached with bailing wire to the pvc at two places (end and about a third up the run) to keep it in place and we invariably get a couple days each winter where we get gusts of 60mph (all day average in the 40 mph range).  Hope this helps.



https://www.facebook.com/groups/xLights/permalink/2000371286665283/
Bentonville Heart Lites (www.facebook.com/bheartlites)
 This is just my opinion/suggestion/viewpoint.  Others with other viewpoints/experiences may have different advice.  I am a hobbyist with a couple years real world experience, not an expert.

Offline Xmas!

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Re: Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2019, 07:56:35 AM »
That looks great mararunr!
My name is Steve and I'm just getting started. but I think this will become a huge hobby!!

Offline k6ccc

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Re: Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2019, 05:21:40 PM »
<snip>  I was thinking of creating an "X" using pipe and a screw to allow for any pitch of roof.  The "X" would sit on the ridge line and the top part of the "X" would hold the frame.  The only thing is this just doesn't provide that much height off the roof.
How much height are you looking for?  Unless you are on a very shallow roof, getting something in the 6 inches or so would be fairly easy.  I am looking into this as I need to re-design what I am doing with my roof peak lights.  I need to get the piece that is holding the lights at least 3 to 4 inches up because I will have one GE Color Effects light above the support and another below.  I have a design in my head that I will play with in the next couple weeks.

Using LOR (mostly SuperStar) for all sequencing - using FPP only to drive P5 and P10 panels.
Jim

Offline PittFan

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Re: Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2019, 12:08:33 PM »
mararunr, your idea is very nice.  seems simple enough.  I think I would place the lights on the roof with the rebar "stands" already propping the lights up as I don't want to get on the roof after it snows!


k6cc, I was thinking only 6 or so inches.  If it snows more, oh well, I don't really want it looking strange sitting too far off the roof either.

Offline k6ccc

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Re: Mounting Pixels on the Roof
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2019, 03:00:02 PM »
k6cc, I was thinking only 6 or so inches.  If it snows more, oh well, I don't really want it looking strange sitting too far off the roof either.
Like you, I would not want it high off the roof, although in the dark, no one would be able to tell...  One thing to keep in mind if the support is not laying on the roof.  You would need to either use something stiff enough not to droop or support it every few feet.  For the past two years my roof peak lights have been on 3/4 inch PVC, but laying on the roof.  I did not like the way it worked out (for several reasons), so planned on changing it.

This is southern California so I don't have to deal with snow, but on both the roofline and the eves, I have dual rows of lights so I can make the lights hop.  Below are two photos of how I mounted the lights on the eves, but that technique would not work for the peaks without a raised support.  As a result, I did something different on the peaks and did not like the result.  What I'm thinking of for 2019 is use angle steel as the support for the lights and just use tie wraps similar to what mararunr did.  Then use the X concept to support the angle steel.  I'm going to try to prototype it this weekend and will post photos.
BTW, one other issue with the original GE mounting design is that the plastic is UV sensitive.  You can see in the photos that I painted the L bracket, but not the base clip.  The ones on the eves have been installed for about three months in winter for five years and otherwise stored out of the sun.  I had to replace a bunch of both the L brackets and the base clips this year.  On the roof mounting, I was so disappointed after the 2017 season that I planned to rebuild them, so I did not put them away.  Because other stuff took priority (mostly a major electrical upgrade - not light show related), that never happened.  That meant that those lights were in the sun all of 2018.  I had to replace about two thirds of the base clips (the L brackets were not used).  I have a lot of spares for the clips, but I can't be replacing that many for very long.


 

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