Author Topic: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?  (Read 1764 times)

Offline CaptainMurdoch

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2018, 10:44:49 AM »
It only happens with this forum.  Something is weird with this forum's software.   I first noticed it a long time ago and just got used to fixing the font before I click the "post" button (quick trick I use is ctrl-A, then drop-down font-size-10)

Interesting, so your reply shows "font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif" and "size=2".  The odd posts I have seen with small text showed "font=verdana" "size=2px".  When I post, my font face and font size settings just say "font face" and "font size", there is no selected font or size.  Are you saying that when you post, there is already a default font or size selected?  Maybe that is in the settings or profile somewhere.
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Chris

Offline MrTeaIOT

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2018, 10:47:46 AM »
I am using Chrome earlier.  How about now I open using Edge browser?  I did do copy and paste one time another but seem fine on the screen.  Must be Chrome thing. 

Offline CaptainMurdoch

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2018, 10:53:29 AM »
I am using Chrome earlier.  How about now I open using Edge browser?  I did do copy and paste one time another but seem fine on the screen.  Must be Chrome thing.

Came through fine, maybe there is a cookie being set.  We are drifting off topic though.  If you notice the issue come back, maybe we can start another thread to diagnose.

Offline pixelpuppy

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2018, 11:11:43 AM »
We are drifting off topic though.  If you notice the issue come back, maybe we can start another thread to diagnose.


You mean ... like here?  ;)
http://falconchristmas.com/forum/index.php/topic,5618.msg57427.html#msg57427



-Mark

Offline CaptainMurdoch

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2018, 11:19:52 AM »
We are drifting off topic though.  If you notice the issue come back, maybe we can start another thread to diagnose.


You mean ... like here?  ;)
http://falconchristmas.com/forum/index.php/topic,5618.msg57427.html#msg57427

Seems like eons ago.  Can  you see if your font and font size are set when you post next and follow up in that other thread and we can continue there.

Online k6ccc

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Re: How do you test the Power supply actual maximum watts?
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2018, 11:28:05 AM »
What kind of efficiency are you expecting out of these power supplies?  I might expect the Meanwell to hit 85% as K-State-Fan noted, but I would expect a bit lower from the generic power supplies a lot of people are using.

In general terms, for a switching power supply, 85% is pretty low.  90 to 95% is fairly common (with one exception).  It can depend a lot on the percentage of load.  Particularly at a low percentage of load, the efficiency does drop.  My guess is that the 85% stated efficiency of the Meanwell is the worst case (which would be proper for them to state it that way).  Without measuring one, I would make a pretty good bet that at 80% load, it's quite a bit higher than 85% efficient.  I don't have a Meanwell, but I have lots of the Ray Wu clones in both 5V and 12V versions.  If I have time this weekend I'll measure it at a variety of loads and post the results...
Using LOR (mostly SuperStar) for all sequencing - using FPP only to drive P5 and P10 panels.
Jim

 

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