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WS2812B Pixels

Started by jem5136, January 21, 2022, 08:00:12 AM

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Sawdust

Quote from: pixelpuppy on January 31, 2022, 10:47:17 AM
Quote from: Sawdust on January 31, 2022, 09:46:57 AMIP65 = Protected from low pressure water jets from any direction. 
This is waterproof in my area.
You are confusing the difference between water-resistant and waterproof.

Quotedefinitions of waterproof, water-resistant, and water-repellent, as given by the Oxford English Dictionary:

  • Water-resistant: able to resist the penetration of water to some degree but not entirely
  • Water-repellent: not easily penetrated by water, especially as a result of being treated for such a purpose with a surface coating
  • Waterproof: impervious to water
IP65 is not impervious to water and therefore not waterproof.

IP66, 67, 68 are not impervious to water either.  So does that mean we have no waterproof pixels.

algerdes

Interesting.

IP 6x is Dust Tight (No ingress of dust; complete protection against contact.
IP x7 is Immersion up to 1m.
IP x8 is Immersion beyond 1 m. (The equipment is suitable for continuous immersion in water under conditions which shall be specified by the manufacturer. Normally, this will mean that the equipment is hermetically sealed. However, with certain types of equipment, it can mean that water can enter but only in such a manner that it produces no harmful effects.)

Wouldn't IP 68 be "waterproof"?
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Kensington Graves

Not necessarily. Strictly speaking, the IP68 compliance is by agreement with the manufacture.  To meet IP68, the item must survive immersion to a depth specified by the manufacturer that exceeds IP67 (1.0m) for a time period specified by the manufacturer that exceeds IP67 (30 min).  Most frequently it's quoted as immersion at 1.5m for at least 30 min.  So there's a wide range that IP68 can cover without being impervious to water.

munu

IP65 seems pretty ok to me for pixels. It has the highest rating for dust and pretty strong water exposure. IP67 is if you want to dunk stuff into water for a limited pressure and amount of time (like dropping a phone into the toilet, etc). What I would be more concerned about is the orientation of the pixels. It seems like they are mostly emitting light 180 degrees rather than 360 degrees. It might still be a good option for permanent displays along the eaves with U channels. My only concern is the 5V as somebody else mentioned. This string is 100m (~330') and 1000 pixels. It seems like you need multiple power injections for this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_Code

algerdes

You are correct about normal light dispersion of almost all pixels. (Pixels not in an enclosure, such as a C9 cover or a sphere.) We try to keep them pointed up, or out.  Pointing a pixel downward seems to invite problems if there is any mis-manufacturing.
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pixelpuppy

#20
Quote from: munu on February 02, 2022, 12:23:12 AMIt seems like they are mostly emitting light 180 degrees rather than 360 degrees.
Quote from: algerdes on February 02, 2022, 09:29:19 AMYou are correct about normal light dispersion of almost all pixels. (Pixels not in an enclosure, such as a C9 cover or a sphere)

These particular pixels are a bit different.  I have some of these and they do light up *mostly* all directions.  The physical led chips point out in one direction but they are covered in a diffusing epoxy 'blob' that glows and spreads the light out all directions.  Sure its brighter on the front than on the back, but its not bad for indoor use without worrying too much about the orientation.  They are not really practical in outdoor use for other reasons already mentioned.

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robbiet

The debate on using these outdoors or not is interesting.  I ordered a small set to test and they do seem very sturdy yet lightweight.  The epoxy seems to be sealed well and looks like they may hold up well.  I decided to go for it and ordered two spools of 1000 from Ray.  He does claim they are "waterproof" so that is good enough for me to try.  I guess I will be the guinea pig.

For one spool, I am planning swap out some C9 style pixels that I put on shrubs.  They drive me nuts getting them on there each year and I'm looking forward to swapping them out for these.  Each shrub used to have 50 C9's but going to put 200 of these on instead.  Hoping it works well and looks great.

For the second spool, I'm going to build a 16x50 flat tree.  The tree will be 15' tall and the strings will only be supported at the top and bottom using the wire itself.  I'm not planning to use any mounting for the strings themselves which I know is typically a bad idea with standard pixels.  However, the first thing I noticed with the test set I ordered is that it is very strong but has almost no weight to it.  Also, the wire is very thin and I don't think the wind will be an issue.  I will have these in a pretty protected part of the yard where there should not be too much exposure from the elements or foot traffic.

I agree with previous comments that these look pretty good from all sides.  The front is definitely brighter but the back still looks pretty good.  I'm not going to worry about the orientation for the shrubs but will try to keep them pointing forward for the flat tree.

Fingers crossed.

jem5136

Quote from: robbiet on February 02, 2022, 07:49:17 PMThe debate on using these outdoors or not is interesting.  I ordered a small set to test and they do seem very sturdy yet lightweight.  The epoxy seems to be sealed well and looks like they may hold up well.  I decided to go for it and ordered two spools of 1000 from Ray.  He does claim they are "waterproof" so that is good enough for me to try.  I guess I will be the guinea pig.

For one spool, I am planning swap out some C9 style pixels that I put on shrubs.  They drive me nuts getting them on there each year and I'm looking forward to swapping them out for these.  Each shrub used to have 50 C9's but going to put 200 of these on instead.  Hoping it works well and looks great.

For the second spool, I'm going to build a 16x50 flat tree.  The tree will be 15' tall and the strings will only be supported at the top and bottom using the wire itself.  I'm not planning to use any mounting for the strings themselves which I know is typically a bad idea with standard pixels.  However, the first thing I noticed with the test set I ordered is that it is very strong but has almost no weight to it.  Also, the wire is very thin and I don't think the wind will be an issue.  I will have these in a pretty protected part of the yard where there should not be too much exposure from the elements or foot traffic.

I agree with previous comments that these look pretty good from all sides.  The front is definitely brighter but the back still looks pretty good.  I'm not going to worry about the orientation for the shrubs but will try to keep them pointing forward for the flat tree.

Fingers crossed.
I'll be interested to see how it turns out. I've been trying to think of different ways to mount these pixels versus the typical 12mm pixels. I would love to see the finished product once you've built it.

algerdes

With this info, this is turning out to be real interesting.  Please, keep us informed.
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Bwinter

I've been playing around with these new pixels as well, and can certainly think of a number of good ways to implement them.

How well will they hold-up outdoors in the winter?  My guess is BETTER than LED strips (even those that are in "waterproof" sleeve), but probably (?) not as good as the regular LED bullets (even though I would argue that these mini pixels have a better all-around epoxy-seal than the regular LED bullets).



robbiet

I think it will come down to how well the epoxy stays sealed around the wire over time.  Could be an situation where they last a season but then after baking in the sun for a while water starts to make its way in.  We shall see.

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