Falcon Christmas

Other Controllers and Hardware => Protocols - DMX/E1.31/DDP => Topic started by: dkulp on January 10, 2019, 03:03:27 PM

Title: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 10, 2019, 03:03:27 PM
What is DDP:
DDP is another protocol designed to transfer pixel channel data to a controller.  It's very similar to e1.31, but is more efficient and in some cases is easier to use.

Network efficiency comparison:
A DDP packet consist of a 10 byte header followed by up to 1440 bytes of channel data.   So less than 1% of the network bandwidth is "wasted" for non-channel data.   e1.31, on the other hand, has a 126 byte header followed by up to 512 bytes of channel data, thus wasting up to about 20%.   For large channel counts, DDP can significantly help reduce network traffic.

Channel configuration:
E1.31 data is always associated with a "universe".  Each universe has up to 512 bytes of data.   Thus, both sequencers and controllers need to handle mapping start channels of props/objects/strings/whatever to appropriate universes and offsets in the universe.  This is both error prone and confusing.   In addition, various controllers have certain restrictions as to whether a port can cross a universe boundary or whether a universe should be 510 channel (divisible by 3) or 512.    DDP eliminates all of that by using absolute channel numbers.  Each DDP packet includes the start channel for the data in that packet.

Listener/Controller configuration:
With e1.31, the controller needs to know if it has to be setup for unicast (only needs to open a single port) or multicast (needs to register on a separate multicast address for each universe).  In addition, the controller needs to know how many channels to expect on each universe and map them accordingly.   Again, this is very complex and generally error prone.  One wrong number entered and everything can appear messed up.  It's also important to note that this HAS to match what the computer is sending.  If they don't match, things won't appear correctly.  DDP just opens a single port and since the data packet has the start channel, it just uses that as it comes in.

Synchronization:
DDP can include a flag in the last packet to say "this is all the data, display now".   Thus, the controller doesn't need to guess if it's time to display or not.  e1.31 DOES have the ability to use a separate sync from on a specific universe, but this also requires additional setup on both sender and receiver to implement, and very few controllers support it.   For things like large matrices, this can eliminate "tearing" or other artifacts as the controller knows "I have the full frame, display it" instead of trying to guess (or waiting for a 50ms timeout or similar)

DISADVANTAGE of DDP:
There is one main disadvantage of DDP: it doesn't support Multicast.   For wireless controllers that have unreliable connections, multicast allows those controllers to drop off without impacting the rest of the show.  Also, multiple controllers can be configured to receive the same e1.31 universe via multicast.  Those situations should likely continue using e1.31.

Configuring FPP to accept incoming data (to display on a Matrix panel or hat/cape or similar):
With e1.31, you have to go to the Channel Inputs page and define all the universes you plan to receive.  There could be a lot of them.  Large matrices can have 10's or even 100's of universes.   With DDP, you do nothing.  As soon as you put FPP into Bridge mode, it always has DDP listening for data.   Again, there is NOTHING to configure for FPP.

Configuring xLights to send data:
For e1.31, in xLights, you need to figure out how many universes you need, how many channels per universe, etc... and either create a BUNCH of e1.31 outputs or a single "multi" e1.31 output.   Again, this needs to match what is configured on FPP.  For DDP, add a "DDP" output, specify the number of channels that are needed, enter the hostname/ip address, you're done.

For FPP instances that control a large number of channels of props, DDP can help a lot.  If you "normally" run the FPP instance in remote mode, configuring it as DDP in xLights (instead of a Null output) can allow you to "test" things live from xLights.  All you need to do is flip the remote to "Bridge" mode, and enable that output in xLights.   When it's ready, disable in xLights and put it back in remote.   It doesn't consume any universes or require extra setup or anything.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on January 10, 2019, 03:14:37 PM
I have commented to David Pitts about adding support for DDP to Falcon controllers. His answer was positive but no date commitment. He has added ZCPP support to the newest firmware for the F16v3. This actually seems less involved, but I'm not a PIC or FPGA programmer. :(
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: algerdes on January 10, 2019, 04:04:20 PM
Can someone please put together the use of "bridge mode" in FPP as it pertains to this function (DDP)?
I can assume a lot of things, but I'd rather get a clear and concise explanation of this from someone who can explain why this state in FPP.


Thank you.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: pixelpuppy on January 10, 2019, 04:09:55 PM
Can someone please put together the use of "bridge mode" in FPP as it pertains to this function (DDP)?
I can assume a lot of things, but I'd rather get a clear and concise explanation of this from someone who can explain why this state in FPP.


DDP is a more efficient way to send pixel data across a network.   
FPP does not require any configuration to *receive* DDP.  If you put FPP in Bridge Mode it will listen for DDP by default.  (it can still listen for E1.31 universes *if* you have them configured in Channel Inputs)
In xLights Setup, click ADD DDP and set the IP address of your Bridge Mode FPP and the range of channels you want to send to it.


Boom!  Done.  Easy Peasy
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: jem5136 on January 10, 2019, 07:25:30 PM
DDP seems to me like a game changer! Definitely going to follow this. I do have a question though, with DDP being more efficient, would it help reduce lag during show time? Currently running over 100 universes and whenever the display is running there are times (especially during "heavy" sequencing) where the UI to all my FPP's and Falcon's becomes unavailable, once the show/sequence ends I am able to access the UI again. If I were to switch to DDP, would this help lessen or eliminate that issue?
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on January 10, 2019, 09:10:10 PM
Bridge Mode - when you put an FPP (Pi or Beagle) in Bridge Mode, it behaves like an E1.31 controller. It "listens" for input, generally on ETH0 but will also on WLAN0.  FPP running any v2.0 or higher version will accept E1.31 Unicast, E1.31 Multicast and DDP Unicast.

In my recent setup, I had 8 FPPs running in Bridge Mode, all connected by CAT5 to a 16port Gigabit switch, and all data was being sent from a RasPi 3B+ from its Gigabit ethernet port.

As far as lag goes, there was none. Ever. 154,000 channels (300 universes). I attribute the good performance to using CAT5 instead of Wireless and the use of DDP to all 8 FPPs.  I was also sending E1.31 to three FalconF16 boards (One V3, a V2Red and V2Blue)
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: algerdes on January 10, 2019, 09:28:32 PM
What I am looking for here is the reason someone would even have an FPP out there if all it is going to do is act like a controller.
 
About the only thing I can think of is that the FPP is acting as a "switch" or "router", parsing out the data that it receives to different controllers downstream from it.  Seems like a waste, having to do the extra processing at the second FPP when the first FPP or xSchedule Player can send directly to the controllers themselves.


Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 11, 2019, 03:56:00 AM

Because in many cases, the FPP instance IS the controller directly driving lights.    The two main uses cases are:


1) P5/10 panels - in this case the Hat/Cape is on the Pi/Beagle and the panels are directly attached.   By accepting DDP, we can get the large number of channels into the FPP instance much more efficiently to display on the panels. The large P5 setups can consume 100's of universes which is a pain to setup/maintain and isn't terribly efficient.


2) Pixels directly attached: the most common is the PiHat (2 strings of 800 pixels), but the BBB has a bunch of different capes that can drive up to 48 strings of 800 pixels each.   In that case, the Pi/BBB *IS* the controller.   Again, bridge mode allows it to get data from xLights to display on the pixels.   


There are a bunch of other outputs that FPP can do (various DMX, Renard, nRF24L01, PixelNet, raw GPIO toggles, etc...) that cannot be done easily directly from xLights/xSchedule. 


You cannot think of FPP as just a player or scheduler.   It is a complete controller as well. 
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on January 11, 2019, 05:46:41 AM
What I am looking for here is the reason someone would even have an FPP out there if all it is going to do is act like a controller.

My initial thought was - In the past, they make very good controllers. Now, with DDP, they make GREAT controllers.

The FPPs I had running were "wearing" hats or capes.  Four were BBBs with Octoscrollers. Two were RasPi3 with PiCaps. Two were BBBs with F8B.

The Octoscrollers are a specific use item to drive P10 panels. I just chose to drive them in Bridge rather than as Wireless Remotes like I had in the past. These four ran as Remotes last year. There was a noticeable (to me) millisecond lag that went away in Bridge.

The RasPi3's with PiCaps I actually used because I had them lying around and it was easier and cheaper than buying a new standalone controller. I'm using both WS2811 pixel outputs to control window borders. The Pi/PiCap size fits nicely in a small CG box placed under the two windows they each control. I ran 12vdc to them from a nearby supply that provides power to an F8-B and its pixels.

The BBBs with F8B's were the same way, except I have used them for the same purpose for two years and they were already wired and ready. The only change this year was that they ran in Bridge mode. This eliminated their wireless dongle plus they ran completely from a uSD card. I find uSD cards to be more reliable than USB drives, especially since I started buying "Extreme Condition" rated uSD cards.

I also used to flash the FPP to eMMC on the BBBs because they do boot a little faster. Silly me. Once the show started, I don't reboot anyway. So they all just boot from the uSD card. Also, if you run in Bridge mode, a 4GB uSD card is all you need since you aren't storing ANYTHING extra on it except settings and some log files.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: algerdes on January 11, 2019, 06:53:13 AM
Very interesting, Dan and Jon.  In the case of the FPP being the controller (hats/capes/etc.) I can definitely see their use in this manner. 


Note that our displays (x3) only use FPPs as feeds to full sized controllers (E682s, F16Vxs, F4Vxs, J1Sys and quite a few others) in either master or remote modes.  The only thing I'm using piCaps for is to provide power to FPP (12v PS) within a stand-a-lone prop and to get a DMX signal to theater style lighting. 
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: pixelpuppy on January 11, 2019, 07:17:41 AM
Note that our displays (x3) only use FPPs as feeds to full sized controllers (E682s, F16Vxs, F4Vxs, J1Sys and quite a few others) in either master or remote modes.


If you're running the show in Master/Remote mode, then DDP doesn't really apply because the channel data is stored on each remote and not sent across the network (except for the initial file copy).   Of course, in this case, you're using e1.31 to send data from FPP to Controller over a dedicated ethernet, but that is because Falcon/SanDevices/J1Sys don't (yet) support DDP.  If they did, you would benefit from using DDP over e1.31 on those connections too. 


Even in a Master/Remote show setup, DDP is still useful for pre-show setup and testing.    I run the show in Master/Remote but still use DDP for pre-show testing and setup.   I still define DDP in xLights (very easy) and when I want to test from xLights all I have to do is flip the FPP from Remote to Bridge (also very easy).
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on January 11, 2019, 07:19:05 AM
Using FPP and hats/caps for controllers is now very usable, especially since they have added things like Virtual Strings and Brightness and Gamma controls to the pixel outputs. The Falcon boards have had that for awhile but some of the other boards you list lag behind in those features.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 11, 2019, 08:53:59 AM
Note that our displays (x3) only use FPPs as feeds to full sized controllers (E682s, F16Vxs, F4Vxs, J1Sys and quite a few others) in either master or remote modes.  The only thing I'm using piCaps for is to provide power to FPP (12v PS) within a stand-a-lone prop and to get a DMX signal to theater style lighting.


Note that it can also useful for that case.  If the full size controller is "hidden" behind the Pi, you COULD put the Pi in DDP bridge mode for testing, it would accept DDP incoming data, it would map the data onto the e1.31 outputs that are sent to the falcon/j1sys/etc...  No need to deal with complicated routing tables forwarding or any of that.

Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: algerdes on January 11, 2019, 10:38:52 AM
Thanks for all that information folks.  I'll keep in mind.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: AAH on January 16, 2019, 03:35:08 AM
  I came across http://www.3waylabs.com/ddp/ when looking for info on DDP. This topic was a few results below.  There is some great info in that post and most of the info won't matter to us punters. The ability to sync pixel outputs is a potentially good feature but potentially a bit redundant and the table at http://www.3waylabs.com/ddp/#Efficiency is good to see the number of pixels at 45fps with different protocols.  I say that the sync is possibly a bit redundant as assuming you are using WS2811 which are fairly slow then if you have long pixel strings (600-1000) then the delay between 1st and last pixel is probably/potentially worse than the DDP/E1.31 sending delay. If you ran zillions of short strings then you could get the beginning and ends of strings fairly much in sync.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 16, 2019, 05:37:51 AM
We use the 'push' flag already which does help if you run things like large P# matrices in bridge mode.   In bridge mode, every 50ms (settable on advanced settings), we take whatever data is in the buffer and send it out.   However, we don't know if we are in the middle of receiving a frame of data or anything so you can potentially get tearing.   With DDP, if we get the push flag, we send the data out immediately and restart the timer.  Thus, you are much more likely to have the full frame available.  I actually suggest with bridge mode and DDP to set the timer higher (100ms) and let the push flags control when the frame is displayed.     You would get much better timing than you do with normal e1.31 setup.  (That said, I did update the e1.31 bridge code to also accept sync packets and do the same thing, just quite a bit harder to setup than DDP)

Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: najetset on January 17, 2019, 11:09:17 PM
I assume the choice of 1440 bytes of channel data (+10 for the header) was to fit nicely as payload in an ethernet frame?  Perhaps with some headroom left over for a .1Q tag?


If so, for those running jumbo frame networks (9000 octet MTU), can the DDP channel data payload size be increased to make use of the additional frame size?  I noticed today that the DDP setup in xLights max's out at 1440, and can only be reduced (I assume to allow for Q in Q tags?).  This would further increase the efficiency quite dramatically.  I suppose of course that this would also require the use of gigabit (or better) interfaces to be of any value.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 18, 2019, 06:33:39 AM
If so, for those running jumbo frame networks (9000 octet MTU), can the DDP channel data payload size be increased to make use of the additional frame size?  I noticed today that the DDP setup in xLights max's out at 1440, and can only be reduced (I assume to allow for Q in Q tags?).  This would further increase the efficiency quite dramatically.  I suppose of course that this would also require the use of gigabit (or better) interfaces to be of any value.


The spec itself only allows for 1440 due to the MTU.   There's likely a couple reasons, one being that almost all the devices we use just use 100MB ethernet which wouldn't support the jumbo frames.   The other reason is that the receiving buffers on the devices are likely not large enough.  I know in FPP, right now, I just use 1500 byte msg receive buffers as I "assume" that would be the largest.   I'm honestly not sure what would happen if it received a larger packet.    It would obviously not fit in a 1500byte buffer so I don't know if it would fully be dropped (udp would allow dropping frames) or fragment into multiple messages, but that could then really confuse the receive code as msgs wouldn't match the expected headers and such.     I'd be happy to increase the buffer size if someone would like to give it a try.  :)
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: najetset on January 18, 2019, 11:14:54 AM
I'd be happy to increase the buffer size if someone would like to give it a try.  :)

I'll be ordering a sancloud BBE, when it comes in I'll be happy to give it a go.  I'll let you know once it's all set up.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on January 18, 2019, 12:31:41 PM
I'd be happy to increase the buffer size if someone would like to give it a try.  :)

I'll be ordering a sancloud BBE, when it comes in I'll be happy to give it a go.  I'll let you know once it's all set up.


Nope.  Doesn't seem to support jumbo frames:
Code: [Select]
[20284.298261] eth0: Invalid MTU 9000 requested, hw max 1500


Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: kd7hgt on March 24, 2019, 10:05:32 AM
So is this mainly for out P5/P10 panel setups?  I just deleted my Null setups for Xlights and changed them to DDP.  How are we doing the E131 stuff that directs it to the Falcon?  In my new DDP setup do I use the IP Address "Port" of my remote FPP?   Still trying to figure this DDP out.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on March 24, 2019, 11:12:50 AM
So is this mainly for out P5/P10 panel setups?  I just deleted my Null setups for Xlights and changed them to DDP.  How are we doing the E131 stuff that directs it to the Falcon?  In my new DDP setup do I use the IP Address "Port" of my remote FPP?   Still trying to figure this DDP out.


At this point, it's very useful for the P# setups, but it's also useful for things like PiHats and the various BBB based pixel controllers. 
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on March 24, 2019, 12:59:41 PM
So is this mainly for out P5/P10 panel setups?  I just deleted my Null setups for Xlights and changed them to DDP.  How are we doing the E131 stuff that directs it to the Falcon?  In my new DDP setup do I use the IP Address "Port" of my remote FPP?   Still trying to figure this DDP out.

FPP units (Pi or BBB) can received DDP when they are in Bridge Mode. That's all the "setup" needed to make them DDP users. Of course, you'll still have to setup any pixel or panel outputs as for any other FPP mode of operations.

And, yes, you just need the IP address or (Dan says he's done this but I haven't) you can send DDP to the DNS Name you've given to the FPP unit.
I used DDP for everything this last Christmas (except for Falcon controllers that don't YET understand DDP).
It was great, eliminating many many many universe lines of setup in xLight and reducing network traffic due to packet efficiency.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: jnealand on March 24, 2019, 04:01:12 PM
As I understand it there is no benefit if running master/remote with wifi sync.  It is basically for wired communications.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on March 24, 2019, 05:54:52 PM
As I understand it there is no benefit if running master/remote with wifi sync.  It is basically for wired communications.


More or less.  However, if you have your remotes setup in xLights as DDP (instead of a null output or similar), then you can easily test things on the live lights by flipping FPP from remote to bridge mode.   It's very simple.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Stormyblade on April 09, 2019, 12:27:18 PM
So, after reading through this topic, I have a question or two regarding my current setup, and whether or not setting up DDP would be more efficient/easier/less jumbled/etc:


Let's say, from the Capture1 picture included, my P10 matrix is a 5x4 matrix, 20 panels total, so it would be 60 universes with a total of 30720 channels, and I have it entered into xLights as a "normal" E1.31 entry (I couldn't include all 60 line entries in the screen capture, but you get the idea). Are you guys suggesting that to convert over to a DDP setup entry all I have to do in xLights is make an entry as I did in the Capture2 picture? Also, is there going to be a problem if I tell my BBB/Octoscroller to be in Bridge mode vs Remote mode when I am running my show and sequences? You guys mentioned that you flip from Remote to Bridge and back to test your matrix - that's why I am asking which mode to use when running.


Also, this year I am "upgrading" my P10 matrix to P5 panels - the matrix will be the same size, a 5x4, for a total of 20 panels, just in P5 pitch. This will double the channels and universes - this should not affect the way that the DDP protocol handles the data, correct?


I'm still trying to wrap my head around some of this and I think I understand it, but I just want to be sure I understand it.  ;D
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on April 09, 2019, 12:43:42 PM



P10 -> P5 is quadruple the data, not double. 


For the most part, you are completely correct.   It's a single entry in the xLights setup.   Obviously make sure the start channels are correct and the number of channels allocated to that DDP output entry covers the number of channels needed for the matrix, but that's relatively simple.


With a matrix that size, we generally would recommend running in remote mode in your show.   123K channels is a LOT of data to get across the network, even with DDP.  Thus, sticking with remote mode keeps the amount of network traffic down.   However, when testing things from within xLights, you may want to see what things look like on the "live lights".   Flipping the FPP over to Bridge mode and "enabling" the output in xLights allows that.   However, as mentioned, it's a TON of network traffic so it often doesn't look quite as good from xLights as in remote mode. 
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Stormyblade on April 09, 2019, 04:23:35 PM
Thanks, Dan, for both giving me that explanation and correcting my math.  ;)


I'd love to enable a DDP output within xLights to help erase all those lines of universe entries within the Setup tab -- my inner OCD loves it when I have fewer lines to scroll through. It sounds as though utilizing DDP in xLights and in FPP will help me have less screen clutter to go through. I'm still waiting on my P5 panels to show up from the January pre-sale, but I've already been going through my xLights setup with the intention of trying to make things less messy and to add my extra props I bought for this coming season.


Edit: I didn't mention it here, but I have mentioned last year that this network is on it's own private network, meaning I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on April 09, 2019, 05:02:50 PM
... I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?

When I went DDP to all my Bridge Mode FPPs (4 P10 panel matrices), plus a few E1.31 controllers, I had to go to a 16-port Gigabit switch.
By the time I was done and running, I had 5 ports left open on that switch.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: dkulp on April 09, 2019, 06:24:30 PM
Edit: I didn't mention it here, but I have mentioned last year that this network is on it's own private network, meaning I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?


Network congestion - no, but you may be hitting other limits.   Using 25ms timing, 20 P5 panels will be around 6MB/s.  On the 100MB connections that both the Pi 3 (not B+) and BBB use, that's a very significant chunk of it.    Just something to be aware of.  It is a lot of data. 
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Stormyblade on April 09, 2019, 07:28:35 PM

... I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?
When I went DDP to all my Bridge Mode FPPs (4 P10 panel matrices), plus a few E1.31 controllers, I had to go to a 16-port Gigabit switch.By the time I was done and running, I had 5 ports left open on that switch.



Why did you have to go to a 16 port switch? In my display, I have (will have):



That is only 5 ports, plus the 1 coming in from the Rasp Pi, so I have 2 left. I hope I don't have to change that out.


Edit: I didn't mention it here, but I have mentioned last year that this network is on it's own private network, meaning I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?



Network congestion - no, but you may be hitting other limits.   Using 25ms timing, 20 P5 panels will be around 6MB/s.  On the 100MB connections that both the Pi 3 (not B+) and BBB use, that's a very significant chunk of it.    Just something to be aware of.  It is a lot of data.



Dan, given my layout above, with me having a Rasp Pi 3 (it's actually a Rasp Pi 3 B v1.2), do you think I'll be okay with this device, or should I upgrade to the 3 B+?  If I do change out to the B+, will I choke the BBB with the extra data?
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Poporacer on April 09, 2019, 10:02:38 PM
Thanks, Dan, for both giving me that explanation and correcting my math.  ;)

I'd love to enable a DDP output within xLights to help erase all those lines of universe entries within the Setup tab -- my inner OCD loves it when I have fewer lines to scroll through.
One way to resolve that would be to delete all of your Universes and re-add them but select  the one output option. This will give you one line of universes for each controller. This won't work if you have universes of different sizes but works great otherwise!


Quote
Edit: I didn't mention it here, but I have mentioned last year that this network is on it's own private network, meaning I've got a Rasp Pi 3 running the entire show that is tied into an 8-port Gigabit router, and everything is hard wired. I shouldn't have network traffic congestion concerns about that setup, right?
With the P5 panels, you might run across limits and congestion
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on April 10, 2019, 07:21:43 AM

With the P5 panels, you might run across limits and congestion

I output all 154k channels (80% DDP , 20% E1.31) from a single RasPi3B+ (running as a Remote) to my Netgear 16 port Gigabit switch.
Perhaps being a Switch makes it more efficient than a Router?
I can definitely say that this was the smoothest my show has ever run, even though 30% larger than prior year. Zero wireless usage. 100% Cat5e.
I do NOT run an isolated network for my show, but the amount of data being transmitted is effectively isolated (display data isolated from "family" data) by my Switch.

Even though the Beaglebones are only 100mbit, I had no data errors or lags on them.
- but, if you watch the status page of a Bridge Mode FPP, you will see errors accumulate from every time FPPD restarted on the transmitting RasPi3B+ but not during "show time."

I did not have P5 panels, just P10, but I was controlling a total of 76 P10 panels in four arrays
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Stormyblade on April 13, 2019, 04:42:11 AM
Thanks, JonB, for that info -- makes me feel much bettet about my plans and design.
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: Stormyblade on April 22, 2019, 07:10:36 PM
Hey guys, just wanted to ask about this Halloween setup that I've been tinkering around with. I may not have the exact # of channels correct for my planned 5x4 P5 matrix, but I'm just throwing around some ideas for setup/layout and was curious if the following images show a correct setup for a DDP-based entry. As you can see, I'm still thinking I need to tie in a direct IP address for the FPP/BBB that will be attached to the matrix.


Thanks in advance.



Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: tuppetsdad on June 25, 2019, 10:43:19 PM
Hi Stormyblade


Looks like you have set up the wrong number of panel strings (Rows) or Nodes per string (Columns) as your XLights shows the wrong number for the address range (too big)


Regards
Title: Re: What is DDP?
Post by: JonB256 on June 26, 2019, 05:14:11 AM
Yes, the DDP setup looks correct except for the End Channel value on the Matrix.

Then, whichever FPP has 192.168.1.250 as its address needs to be in Bridge Mode and configured in Channel Out for that matrix.